Just upgraded to Evernote 5.1.0.2046 (270046) Prelease, and dang – that “hesitate after you type two characters in the search-as-you-type feature is still there”… A few years ago the Support tech told me that bug would go away with the .NET code converstion.

Wishlist for Evernote

I love Evernote. There, I said it. It’s pretty much always been so right from the start.

One of the things I love about them is that they put an intense focus on providing the best user experience on every platform. So whether you are using Windows, Mac, mobile, or web, there’s a native client available for that platform.

One of the other things I love is that they are ALL ABOUT THE DATA…

Data – that’s it. Capture your data. Organize it, if you like. And find it later. It holds everything and it’s beautiful.

But they’ve got some problems, and unfortunately they are problems which have been around for a bit too long now.

For example, the web interface is slooow. It’s better than it was a few years ago when too many tags could cause the user interface to completely lock-up. But it still takes way too long to load and there are too many times when the UI just hangs – e.g., after editing some text or when adding a new note. The web UI needs to be more “spiffy.”

The Windows desktop app, on the whole, it very good. But it’s got a hesitation problem when you are searching for text that causes the entire app to hang after you type the first two characters into the search box. It’s because they are trying to do a “search as you type” feature, and they implemented it with some blocking thread that has some poor performance. I would say fine, no big deal. But the bug has been there for at least several years. It should be gone by now.

Other than these few bugs, I just have one request. I would love a way to comment on an existing note so that the comment showed as a distinct data item somehow attached to the note along with a timestamp. I know I can fudge this by using a note link, but I wish Evernote had something similar to Basecamp’s or Google Doc’s commenting system.

 

Tools that Simplify How You Read the Web

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The web has become so complex that reading simple content on a typical page often feels like an exercise designed to test your powers of concentration.

Between banner ads, pop-ups, sidebars, “Click to continue” links, and similar standard web page features, the important content often gets lost.

Evernote, Instapaper, etc…

A few years ago, Evernote gave us a partial answer in the form of Evernote Clearly. Since then, the tool has been merged into the increasingly useful Evernote Web Clipper.

Other tools have also tried to bridge the gap between what web publishers are serving and what web consumers want to eat – probably most notably Instapaper, which allows you to turn almost any web page into a beautifully formatted, easy-to-read text for offline reading – free of slow load times and intrusive pop-ups.

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Tapped Out?

At this point, the market for offline reading and format-simplication tools for the web is probably about tapped out. Yeah, I’d love to see a merging of the features of Instapaper and Evernote, so that I might have a dedicated sort of hot list of offline reading items that’s easy to use within my vast Evernote account. But altogether I’d say we have some pretty good tools available right now and there’s probably not much new going to happen in this area for a while.

What about you? Got a great feature idea you’d like to see the web tools makers provide right now to help with offline reading?